Ready for the Dog Days?

The "dog days" of summer are coming - are you ready?

Days get hotter. The sun beats down on you before you even get into work, making you tired. Your team has been slaving away and no one can help but to look outside into the sunshine and wonder why they're stuck inside when the rest of the world is having fun. We all pine for an extended vacation to rejuvenate.

You can rejuvenate your team without sending everyone to Hawaii.

Take them on an adventure they'll never forget - for a tiny fraction of the cost.

With Scavenger Hunt-based team building events, your group can get into the sunny days of summer and soak in some sun while bonding with their mates in ways you've never imagined.

Solving problems together in a fun, relaxed setting that puts no one's life or limb at risk over zip-line canyons or behind the wheel of gas-guzzling, exhaust-choking vehicles will bring smiles to their faces.

They'll love working for such a cool boss.

They won't even notice that it's too hot outside, even for a dog to work.

 

 

Independence vs. Interdependence

Do you have an independent or interdependent team? We often don’t stop to think about the difference, and the word “team” has come to mean so many things. Paying attention to the type of team we have may help us when trying to plan and work together.

Interdependent Teams

  • Each team member is needed to accomplish the main task at hand and the team cannot function with out all members  EXAMPLE: Football team, sled dog team

Independent Teams

  • Each team member accomplishes personal tasks which assist the team in an overall goal  EXAMPLE: Bowling, sales team

Put one foot forward by understanding the type of team you have and how they can best work to accomplish the primary business goals set by your company.

   

Do you have an all-star team? Part 2

In a previous post we noted that every major league sport these days puts together an exhibition of the "best of the best" - an all-star game, pitting the top players against each other in friendly competition. It's a treat for the fans as well as the players to see (or be) only the very best in action against the other top players in the league.

The problem with all-star teams is that while each individual may be very good at what they do, they often don't play well together as a team. Not because they don't WANT to, but because they are drawn from other teams, thrown into a do-or-die one-game situation, unfamiliar with each other's strengths and weaknesses, habits and heroics.

Errors abound.

Even all-stars need to work together as a team to achieve maximum success. They need to communicate, to give each other chances to succeed, to find opportunities to help each other and be helped.

Do you have an all-star team?

Could they be even better if they played TOGETHER more?

   

Do you have an all-star team?

Every major league sport these days puts together an exhibition of the "best of the best" - an all-star game, pitting the top players against each other in friendly competition. It's a treat for the fans as well as the players to see (or be) only the very best in action against the other top players in the league.

If your organization had an "all star" game today, would your team be well represented?

Put another way, is your team comprised of all stars?

If so, are they all playing at the top of their game?

If it is and they are: what are you doing for them? Are you rewarding them with an "all star game"?

If not, why not?

Wouldn't that be fun to be part of... or to watch?

(Hint:  the answer is not "no.")

 

   

Eggs and Glory

I saw team building in action a few weeks ago at one of our biggest Run Brain Run team building events yet to date. My position of Game Director placed me as the manager of the most unruly, out of this world, egg relays I have ever seen. Well, I haven’t seen that many unruly large egg relays, but this definitely tops the list for biggest egg relays. Teams of twenty-five people competing to get their fragile eggs across the soccer field length finish line. Five hundred people and about ten dozen eggs seems like it could be a recipe for disaster. Instead it was a stroke of genius. 

It seems silly to have this as a small part of the game, but what it did was force the group to work together, pick a strategy, and then follow through with a plan. All as a team. The most important rule was that everyone had to participate and the results were truly inspiring. I have never seen so many creative strategies for moving an egg on a spoon.

Props to the participants for their eggcellent (pun intended) use of strategy and working together.

   

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